Dinosaur Valentine Cards – Free Printable

If your littles love dinosaurs as much as mine have, they’ll love the Dinosaur Valentine Cards I recently created. Punch two holes through the card and tie a small dino toy as a gift (like these DINO-mite valentines I made for G several years ago). Or use washi tape to attach a lollipop or pencil to one. OR! Go old-school and simply let them hand one to their special friends.

Days, weeks, months are all running together thanks to the pandemic. I can’t believe I’m already seeing Valentine’s Day commercials on TV! That’s usually my cue to plan a Valentine’s Day post, and I’m sharing it today to give you time to get ready yourself.

I’m not sure what Valentine’s Day will look like for G and L  this year. Will their teachers gloss over it as they have with Halloween and Christmas? Or will we be asked to drop off Valentine cards at school for some kind of distribution? 

If your kids are back in school, or if they’re learning in a pod, these Dinosaur Valentines will be a fun way for them to tell their peers they’re awesome!

A thing about my printables:

This Valentine printable is 8.5×11 inches. You will need to cut the cards out yourself. If you’d like to use these Valentines, feel free to download the file and print a few out. But please….

  • This printable is for PERSONAL USE ONLY
  • You MAY NOT resell, redistribute, or claim the original as your own
  • If you post this on the internet, please give credit to this blog, Muddy Boots and Diamonds, and link back to this specific post so others can obtain the resource.
  • I’d love to see how you incorporated this scavenger hunt into your Halloween plans! Feel free to tag me (Twitter: @bootsndiamonds or IG: @muddybootsndiamonds) when sharing your photos!

Download your Dinosaur Valentine Cards for Kids here.

 

Looking for more Valentine’s Day ideas for your family or students? Check out my Valentine’s Day board on Pinterest!

December Holidays Word Search

December is full of reasons to celebrate, but growing up only one was a major focus: Christmas.

So far, it’s really no different for my kids. In school, they sing Christmas Carols. They create Christmas crafts. Their assignments are Christmas-themed. 

On the surface, that’s okay considering it’s what our family celebrates. However, I always think about the kids who don’t celebrate Christmas.

Growing up, I was friends with a girl who celebrated Hanukkah. I remember in 5th grade a mutual friend of ours handed her a Christmas card. My friend wasn’t happy. Why would our friend give her a Christmas card when she’s Jewish? That moment taught me the importance of recognizing other religions besides our own.  

December is a month of celebration, some religious some not. Mostly, it’s a time to show others how much you love and appreciate them. It’s a time to reflect on the past and look forward to the future.

December Holidays Word Search for Kids social media image via muddy boots and diamonds blog

Last month, I created a Thanksgiving word search, and I decided it would be a good project for this month’s blog post (ugh, the pandemic is really hindering my writing capabilities!). I wanted to create an activity that I wish my kids’ teachers would hand them this time of year; an activity that helps show kids that there’s more to December than Christmas (break from school).

I chose three of the bigger celebrations: Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa. Full disclosure: I only know the basics of Hanukkah and Kwanzaa. I’ve included a small blurb for all three, with links so you can learn more.

Hanukkah

Hanukkah (or Chanukah) means “dedication” in Hebrew. This holiday begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar and usually falls in November or December. Often called the Festival of Lights, the holiday is celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts.

Learn more at History.

Christmas

Christmas is a Christian holiday honoring the birth of Jesus. It has evolved into a worldwide religious and secular celebration, incorporating many pre-Christian and pagan traditions into the festivities, such as the Yule Log and Christmas Tree.

Learn more at History.

Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa was created in 1966 by Dr. MaulHe wanted to find a way to bring African Americans together as a community after the Watts riots in Los Angeles. Each evening, there is candle-lighting ceremony in which one candle is lit and one of the seven principles is discussed:

  • Unity: Umoja (oo–MO–jah)
  • Self-determination: Kujichagulia (koo–gee–cha–goo–LEE–yah)
  • Collective Work and Responsibility: Ujima (oo–GEE–mah)
  • Cooperative Economics: Ujamaa (oo–JAH–mah)
  • Purpose: Nia (nee–YAH)
  • Creativity: Kuumba (koo–OOM–bah)
  • Faith: Imani (ee–MAH–nee)

Learn more at the Official Kwanzaa Website and History

 

December Holidays Word Search for Kids Pinterest Image

A religion class I took in college helped me realize that there are a lot more similarities between religions than most of us realize. Throughout the year, I try to talk to my kids about the holidays that are celebrated besides our own as they come up on the calendar. I wholeheartedly believe that by teaching our kids about holidays and traditions different from our own, we’ll raise more empathetic humans.

I hope you’ll find this December Holidays word search a useful — and fun! — way to introduce other holidays besides your own.

A thing about my printables:

This word search is 8.5×11 inches. If you’d like to use this for yourself, feel free to download it and print a few out. But please….

  • This printable is for PERSONAL USE ONLY
  • You MAY NOT resell, redistribute, or claim the original as your own
  • If you post this on the internet, please give credit to this blog, Muddy Boots and Diamonds, and link back to this specific post so others can obtain the resource.
  • I’d love to see how you incorporated this scavenger hunt into your Halloween plans! Feel free to tag me (Twitter: @bootsndiamonds or IG: @muddybootsndiamonds) when sharing your photos!

Download your December Holidays Word Search for Kids here.

Free Thanksgiving Word Search for Kids

The United States is getting ready for another major holiday in the time of COVID-19 — Thanksgiving. 

Our family doesn’t have anything spectacular planned. We have opted to stay home for Thanksgiving; much to the chagrin of some of our extended family. As Mr. Boots is working in and out of various hospitals, we just don’t want to risk sending the grandparents to the hospital, or worse.

Honestly, I encourage everyone to lay low at home this year because of the stories I’ve read from doctors and nurses lately. They’re burned out, they’re stressed out. We can all do them a huge solid by finding alternative ways to be together but apart this Thanksgiving.

Mr Boots and I will probably Face Time and Skype our families at some point to say hello. I’ve heard of some families who will do something similar during Thanksgiving dinner. A few of my friends are trying to plan activities to do with their friends and families that can be completed in their own homes. I thought my latest printable would be a great fit for that: a Thanksgiving Word Search.

Thanksgiving Word Search for Kids with Word Bank and Turkey Embelishments via MuddyBootsAndDimonds.comThis Thanksgiving word search is geared towards kids, but anyone can use it while they wait for the turkey to finish baking. It’s also a great activity for socially distancing families and friends to complete. Just send everyone the link to this page and ask them to print out their own copies. Complete it together while you’re Zooming, or Face Timing, or Google Meeting!

Pinterest Image of Thanksgiving Word Search for Kids via MuddyBootsAndDiamonds.Com

A thing about my printables:

This word search is 8.5×11 inches. If you’d like to use this for yourself, feel free to download it and print a few out. But please….

  • This printable is for PERSONAL USE ONLY
  • You MAY NOT resell, redistribute, or claim the original as your own
  • If you post this on the internet, please give credit to this blog, Muddy Boots and Diamonds, and link back to this specific post so others can obtain the resource.
  • I’d love to see how you incorporated this scavenger hunt into your Halloween plans! Feel free to tag me (Twitter: @bootsndiamonds or IG: @muddybootsndiamonds) when sharing your photos!

Download your Thanksgiving Word Search for Kids here.

 

What are your Thanksgiving 2020 plans?

Halloween Scavenger Hunt Printable

With COVID-19 still a huge problem in America, Halloween is starting to look a little different for kids this year. The CDC has already recommended that we skip trick-or-treating and a few cities have attempted to ban it this year. Now, families are trying to figure out how to keep the Halloween spirit alive while possibly skipping the most iconic part of the holiday.

We haven’t decided what we will do about trick-or-treating; Mr Boots and I are not in agreement on the subject. But I’m determined to give the boys a fun Halloween 2020 despite the pandemic no matter what we decide.

Our neighborhood has a few houses that go all out for Halloween. I thought it would be fun to create a Halloween scavenger hunt for the boys. We can either walk up the street or drive around the neighborhood after dinner so they can look for the items on the list.

Halloween Scavenger Hunt Free Printable pin via Muddy Boots and Diamonds

I’m sharing this latest project with you! You can grab your own copy of the Halloween scavenger hunt by clicking the link at the end of this post 🙂

A thing about my printables:

This worksheet is 8.5×11 inches. If you’d like to use this for yourself, feel free to download it and print a few out. But please….

  • This printable is for PERSONAL USE ONLY
  • You MAY NOT resell, redistribute, or claim the original as your own
  • If you post this on the internet, please give credit to this blog, Muddy Boots and Diamonds, and link back to this specific post so others can obtain the resource.
  • I’d love to see how you incorporated this scavenger hunt into your Halloween plans! Feel free to tag me (Twitter: @bootsndiamonds or IG: @muddybootsndiamonds) when sharing your photos!

Download your Halloween Scavenger Hunt here!

Social Distancing Journal for Kids – FREE Printable

Writing is a form of therapy for me, and I am finding myself in need of it now that life has been turned around due to the COVID-19 pandemic. I’m at home with three kids unable to venture out while my husband is working on HVAC systems in area hospitals. I’m learning how to homeschool, entertain kids in ages 11 months – 8 years, not worry about the virus coming home with my husband, and basically keep my sanity all at the same time.

We’re living through a major moment in history.

I’m trying to journal my way through this moment — both to document how my life has changed and work through my feelings — and I want my kids to do the same. But I wasn’t sure they’d really like sitting down and writing about their day, so I decided to create a journal for them.

The My Social Distancing Journal is a 30-page document with a different daily prompt for the boys to write or draw (or both) about. Some prompts let them think about how the pandemic is affecting them (How has your life changed since our family began social distancing?) and some are fun (If you had three wishes, what would they be?). There is also space for them to write the date at the top, track the weather, and circle an emotion to relay how they’re feeling that day.

My Social Distancing Journal page pencil red pencil sharpener © Muddy Boots and Diamonds

I am using this journal as part of our homeschooling adventure. The bulk of the boys’ schoolwork is being done in a couple of hours in the morning. After nap/quiet time in the afternoon, I’ve had them complete one page of the journal. Being six and eight, they’d rather draw a picture for their answer versus write. But I’ve had them write at least a short phrase describing their illustration. They also need to write out the date at the top of each page for practice.

While the fun prompts have been pretty easy to think about, the ones regarding the COVID-19 pandemic have been tougher. But that’s not a bad thing! It’s actually given us a chance to talk about what is going on in the world and think about how our actions can affect the community.

Social Distancing Journal for Kids FREE DOWNLOAD via muddybootsanddiamonds.com

I’m sharing pages 1-5 of the journal with you! The prompts included are:

  1. How has your life changed since our family began practicing Social Distancing?
  2. What do you think your teacher is doing today?
  3. What do you think the birds are thinking today?
  4. If you could visit any planet in our solar system, which would it be? What would you do when you got there?
  5. What do you miss most about school?

A thing about my printables:

This worksheet is 8.5×11 inches. If you’d like to use this for yourself, feel free to download it and print a few out. But please….

  • This printable is for PERSONAL USE ONLY
  • You MAY NOT resell, redistribute, or claim the original as your own
  • If you post this on the internet, please give credit to this blog, Muddy Boots and Diamonds, and link back to this specific post so others can obtain the resource.
  • I’d love to see how you use this worksheet! Please feel free to tag me (Twitter: @bootsndiamonds or IG: @muddybootsndiamonds) when sharing your photos!

Download your copy of the first five pages of the My Social Distancing Journal for Kids

 

You can bind the journal as you see fit. I considered putting these in a three-ring binder but decided to stick the pages in a pocket folder for now. I’ll likely bind the journal when the boys have completed it.

But wait, there’s more! Sign up for my newsletter and receive the entire journal — all 30 pages!